Gum disease and Type 2 diabetes

February is Gum Disease Awareness Month. I want to share with you the importance of taking excellent care of your teeth and gums, especially if you have Type 2 diabetes; this is a very personal issue for me.

an illustration of how gum disease works

I have always had beautiful, strong teeth, partly due to my twice-daily brushing routine and partly due to good genetics. During my college years, I stopped going to the dentist regularly because it was a pain to schedule the appointments and because I never found a practitioner that I liked.

I was a good brusher, so I didn’t worry about not keeping up my dental visits until one day, quite suddenly (or so it seemed), my gums were bleeding and my front tooth was a little wobbly. I still tried to ignore it and hope it would go away, but, much like the Type 2 diabetes I was also ignoring at the time, nothing good comes of burying your head in the sand about gum disease (also known as gingivitis or periodontitis).

Once I’d started dealing with my diabetes and had a better handle on my blood sugar, I decided to deal with the problems with my teeth, so I made an appointment with a local dentist and hoped for the best. Unfortunately, having ignored the early warning signs of periodontitis, I found out that I needed to have 15 of my still-perfect, still-strong teeth removed because the tissue and bone that should have been supporting them had been eaten away by years of untreated infection. If I’d visited a dentist at the first symptoms, I’d probably have saved most, if not all of my teeth; I want you to learn from my mistake.

What are some of the risk factors for developing gum disease?
  • Not following a good dental hygiene regimen, to include brushing twice daily, flossing once each day, and visiting a dentist at least once a year (more frequently if you have any of the risk factors listed below)
  • Family history of gum disease (turns out both of my grandmothers plus my mother all have it although no one ever told me about it)
  • A medical condition that weakens your immune system, like diabetes, HIV/AIDS, or cancer
  • Eating a diet high in processed, sugary foods, which promote the growth of the plaque bacteria that cause gum disease

Some of these are clearly beyond our control – you can’t choose your family – but brushing, flossing, and seeing a dentist are things you can fix right now, and eliminating or limiting processed foods will benefit your health far beyond your gums.

Symptoms of gum disease

So what should you watch for, if you have any of the risk factors?

Normal gum tissue is pink, firm, and stretches around your teeth smoothly without any bleeding when you brush and floss.

In people with gingivitis, gums become red, swollen, and tender. They have a tendency to bleed, too. This should send you straight to your dentist for a chat because things are still very treatable at this point.

Once things progress to full-blown periodontitis (which is what I had), gums will pull away from teeth, your teeth may become loose, and you might experience bad breath and oozing pus. If you are at this point and feel overwhelmed, know that I’ve been in your shoes; you will be OK but time is of the essence. Make an appointment with a dentist or periodontist (if your insurance will allow that) immediately so that you can get things cleaned up and be back on a healthy path.

If the thought of losing your teeth isn’t enough to motivate you to action (and it wasn’t for me, so I’m preaching from experience here) then you need to know that gum disease has been linked to some even scarier health problems, like heart disease, dementia, and rheumatoid arthritis. Scientists haven’t pinned down the precise link but it’s probably related to the inflammatory effect of the uncontrolled bacteria in your mouth. (Inflammation is coming up a lot in the literature I read about many different health conditions.)

Bottom line is that gum disease is highly treatable when caught early and can impact your overall health in less-than-desirable ways if you ignore it, so make an appointment with a dental health professional if you have any of the symptoms.

Setting diabetes management goals

It’s January so perhaps you have been thinking about what you’d like to change in 2016. Now is a perfect time to think about setting diabetes management goals – here are my best tips for how to set yourself up for success in the next 338 days and beyond.

setting diabetes management goals will help you cross the finish line
International Canoe Classic Finish Line by City of Minneapolis Archives, on Flickr
Goal setting best practices
  • Give yourself some time to think about not just what you want to achieve, but also why. When the going gets rough and your initial enthusiasm wanes, remembering why you chose this goal can help keep you focused and motivated. A great suggestion from a trusted coach last year was to write down my list of “whys”, snap a photo, and turn it into the screensaver for my mobile phone so that I always have it in front of me; this works well for me.
  • Break large, lofty goals into smaller, measurable to-do items. Three years ago when I started on a journey to improve my blood sugar readings, I wanted to be able to complete the recommended 60 minutes of moderate intensity cardiovascular exercise on five days a week, but I could barely walk 15 minutes at a very slow pace, so I set my first action item to walk for 15 minutes one day a week. I also wanted to eat smaller amounts of food at each meal and eliminate my binge eating, but that prospect was overwhelming so I decided to focus on adding more fruits and vegetables to my existing way of eating. In both of these cases, I knew I needed to do more eventually but doing something small and measurable that would lay the groundwork for more ambitious goals later on was what worked for me.
  • Track your action items each day and evaluate how you are doing at regular intervals. You can check in on your progress on your own if that works well for you, or you may consider finding someone you trust to check in with, for additional accountability.
  • Adjust your action items as needed to continue growing stronger, healthier, and happier. If walking twice a week is one of your commitments and you find that you are easily accomplishing that then perhaps it’s time to add a third day or a few extra minutes to the existing days of walking. For eating changes, it took a few weeks for me to be ready to start tracking everything I ate so that I could evaluate whether (and where) I wanted to reduce calories.
  • If you’re not sure where to start with setting diabetes management goals, seek professional help. I have a wonderful endocrinologist (diabetes doctor), a registered dietician (for meal planning ideas), a physical therapist (for strength training and flexibility regimens), and a psychotherapist (for emotional support when it all feels overwhelming) on my diabetes management team. If you don’t like visiting any of the professionals who are supposed to help you manage your diabetes then ask around for referrals to alternative providers – you are paying them to help, you are their customer, and they should put your needs first instead of offering generic ideas about how best to manage your life.
  • Remember that anything that takes you in the direction of achieving your long-term goals is progress and should be celebrated. Find something that you love – preferably not food – to use as a reward for sticking with your action items. I rewarded myself with a facial after the first month of eating differently and exercising more. In the intervening months, I have gifted myself massages, pedicures, new running shoes, a cashmere sweater, and perfume as rewards for continuing to make positive changes. Choose something that you know you’ll enjoy, find a picture of it that you can place somewhere prominent in your environment to remind you about what’s waiting for you.

Finally, be gentle with yourself as you start making changes – this isn’t a race and you won’t always be perfect, so settle in and enjoy the journey.

Project Happy/Healthy Me: June Review and Goals for July/August

My goals for June (and half of July) were:

  1. Work back up to run/walk workouts three times a week – Done. I’m jogging 3/5 of a 5K three times a week and it isn’t totally awful most of the time. We’ll call that a win!
  2. Continue to concentrate on clearing out one quarter of the garage, by myself, for 30 minutes per week – Umm, not much was accomplished on this one but then I never added the Google calendar reminder, either. (Let me take care of that right now.)
  3. Put myself on a clothing, shoes, and accessory spending freeze for the entire month of June. I did fairly well with this one, surprisingly, with only one small purchase – $15 shorts from Target when I realized that the shorts I’d already bought months earlier for my trip to Raleigh/Wilmington/Charleston/Savannah were now falling off of my hips – for the whole month. I’m now halfway through July and I’ve been trying to keep with it – only one dress from J. Crew (originally over $100, I got for $25), a souvenir tee shirt from our visit to Seattle (marked down from $80 to $25), and tops and shorts for yoga (used gift cards and rewards points).

Looking forward, my goals for 2014 have been published and they include:

  • Achieve a healthy Body Mass Index by weighing 140 or fewer pounds,
  • A waist circumference measurement of 30 inches or less,
  • Body fat between 23 and 33% (done – body fat is hovering around 26%)
  • Complete a 10K event in 75 minutes or less,
  • Park both cars in our garage at the same time

What I’ll work on for the remainder of July and the entire month of August:

  1. Take one yoga class each week. My hip flexors and hamstrings are SO tight and it’s affecting my running, Pilates, and overall happiness; hopefully yoga can help.
  2. Work in the garage for 60 minutes at a time, at least twice in the next six weeks. – I’ve put the reminders on the calendar, now let’s see how I follow through.
  3. Put myself on a modified sugar detox. All of the vacations we’ve taken recently have been wonderful and I’ve enjoyed the heck out of all of them, eating very well but not necessarily wisely. Nothing to worry about in the long term, I just need to get back to basics for a little while and focus on whole foods with as little added sugar as possible.

OK, your turn: what small things are you going to work on for the next 46 days to make your life happier and/or healthier?

Project Happy/Healthy Me: March review and goals for June

My goals for March were:

    1. Keep up the run/walk workouts three times a week – I was doing well with this one until the training rides for the American Diabetes Association’s Tour de Cure bike event started getting longer and more intense. I found that my hip flexors were very painful when I tried to combine running with the high intensity and/or long distance biking workouts, so I chose to focus on just the biking until after the event. I was ready to start back with the wogging (walk/jogging) last week when I developed a mysterious shin pain accompanied with some really alarming, unexplained swelling, so I decided to take the week off. At this point, I’m hoping to resume walking workouts and my beloved Pilates Reformer classes for this week and see how I go before putting the wogging back into the rotation.
    2. Continue to concentrate on clearing out one quarter of the garage, by myself, for 30 minutes per week – Oh dear, this one has really not gone well – I haven’t had a decluttering session since February. Some of the reason for the slacking was the long bike rides I was taking every Sunday for my Tour de Cure training but the root of the problem really is my reluctance to deal with the unpleasantness of sorting through all of that useless clutter. I have a bad habit of just ignoring things I don’t want to face – hence the need to lose 110 pounds! – so this is just another manifestation of the same problem. As with my physical health, the cluttered mess of my garage makes me actively unhappy and is a silent reproach each time I drive in, so this must be dealt with.

Unfortunately, I never reported in or set any goals for April or May, so we’ll just move on to what I’d like to focus on for June. My goals for 2014 have been published and they include:

  • Achieve a healthy Body Mass Index by weighing 140 or fewer pounds,
  • A waist circumference measurement of 30 inches or less,
  • Body fat between 23 and 33%,
  • Complete a 10K event in 75 minutes or less,
  • Park both cars in our garage at the same time

So, where to focus my energy for June (and possibly July)?

  1. Work back up to run/walk workouts three times a week – As I explained above, I haven’t done any wogging since March, so I’ll need to ease back into it so as not to hurt myself.
  2. Continue to concentrate on clearing out one quarter of the garage, by myself, for 30 minutes per week – This one is proving to be very challenging, as I discussed above, but it’s simply too important not to keep trying. For June, I’m going to put my 30 minutes on our Google calendar so that I’ll get a reminder and TCB will see it as well. Once something is on the calendar with an electronic reminder, the chances that it will get done increase exponentially.
  3. Put myself on a clothing, shoes, and accessory spending freeze for the entire month of June. It’s bad, people – really, really bad – and it must be curtailed. I don’t know if any of you loved to play dress up with your dolls when you were a kid, but I did. I loved to pick out the perfect outfit, mix and match different pieces to see how they’d look, add just the right purse and shoes, then style her hair just so. For all but 18 months of my adult life I was morbidly obese and forced to make do with whatever the plus size clothing manufacturers deigned to offer in my size, so I focused my obsession on my accessories – let’s not talk about my jewelry, purse, and shoe collections! – because I had no other outlet. Now, however, I find myself blessed with my very own walking, talking fashion doll and I don’t want to stop buying her every adorable outfit that crosses my path. My side of the walk-in closet is packed in as tight as it can go even as my bank account dwindles, so this cannot continue.

OK, your turn: what small things are you going to work on for the next 30 days to make your life happier and/or healthier?

Project: Happy/Healthy Me 2014: January/February review and goals for March

My goals for January were:

  • Re-do the ‘running a 5K course’ that I started (then stopped) last year – Although I’d just finished Week 3 (of 8) when I published my January goals, I hit another brick wall at the start of Week 4. Something about the step up between those two weeks had my hip flexors crying out in pain, again, and I had to stop. After giving in to a really horrible bout of depression that was at least partially brought on by my seeming inability to run more than a couple of kilometers at a time (even interspersed with plenty of walking), I decided to give the running thing another go but this time on my own schedule. Miraculously, it seems to be working out better for me and I’m able to run 3/5 of a 5K (in run 1K, walk 1K repeat format) without feeling that I want to die. This, my friends, is progress!
  • Concentrate on clearing out one quarter of the garage, both of us, for 15 minutes each weekend – While I haven’t been perfect with this goal – and TCB isn’t with the whole “let’s do this thing together” program – noticeable progress has been made. I would guess that I’ve put in 30 minutes at least half of the weeks since I posted this goal and I’ve donated several car loads to the charity shop, taken a couple of boxes of old paperwork to the secure document destruction service, and arranged home pick-up for approximately a cubic yard of e-waste, u-waste, and textiles that were too worn or yucky to be donated to charity. I’ve also started a collection of old writing instruments that I find as I go through boxes and bags of crap because we have boxes at work for donating those as well. I knew when I declared this goal that it was going to take more than one month to clear even a quarter of our garage, so I’m not at all disappointed in how much progress we’ve made – at least we’ve made progress!

You might have noticed that I didn’t set any goals for February. Since I was so late setting my January goals and because my time in late January and most of February was really tight due to work deadlines and my new college class I’m taking, I decided that the same goals would do just as well for February. I did add an additional goal, too, although I didn’t post about it here:

  • Go on a spending fast for 21 days – while I didn’t go to extreme lengths, I did refrain from buying any non-essential items from January 13th through February 3rd. I did window shop a lot and I even pinned a few items to Pinterest to go back to after the fast was over. The funny thing was that, on February 4th when I was convinced I would go absolutely crazy with binge shopping to make up for the fast, I couldn’t think of a single thing I actually wanted. I did a lot of thinking during the fast about buying fewer and better quality items – clothing, for the home, electronics – and suddenly it became much harder to justify giving over our hard-earned money. Even items that are on the most incredible sale ever, if they aren’t truly gorgeous items that I can see myself using or wearing forever or if they aren’t of the very best quality, just aren’t worth it. I have too much cheap junk in my closet, littering my home, and cluttering my garage, so the spending fast was a great way to focus on what I need vs. what I want. I’ve splurged on a few items since then but, much like my eating, there haven’t been any binge episodes and I’m pretty proud of myself for that.

Now that we’ve caught up for January and February, let’s think about what I’d like to work on for the next 30 days.

My goals for 2014 have been published and they include:

  • Achieve a healthy Body Mass Index by weighing 140 or fewer pounds,
  • A waist circumference measurement of 30 inches or less,
  • Body fat between 23 and 33%,
  • Complete a 10K event in 75 minutes or less,
  • Park both cars in our garage at the same time

So, where to focus my energy for March?

  1. Keep up the run/walk workouts three times a week – I’d like to get another solid week under my belt on the current scheme before attempting to increase the first running segment from 1k to 1.5k. If I can go slowly, I’m pretty well convinced that running a full 5K before the end of the year is possible.
  2. Continue to concentrate on clearing out one quarter of the garage, by myself, for 30 minutes per week – In addition to the clutter-busting, I am also going to focus on cleaning the newly cleared areas of dust, debris, and grime. Yes, it’s a garage, but there’s no reason the floor has to be absolutely disgusting!

OK, your turn: what small things are you going to work on in March to make your life happier and/or healthier?

High Five Friday: Sharing Project Me With the World

highfivefriday6

A few months ago, I was approached by a writer for Sanofi USA’s diabetes blog, Discussing Diabetes, to share the story of Project Me with their readers. I still don’t know how they found out about my little health-improvement plan but to say that I was excited about the prospect would be an understatement. I spent an hour at lunch time chatting with a couple of very nice women who wrote what I think is a great piece on the why and what of Project Me. Judge for yourself, if you’d like, because the piece went live yesterday afternoon.

My hope is that people living with chronic diseases, not just diabetes but any ailment that requires focus and diligence to manage successfully, will find something in what I’ve done that will help them make a positive difference in their own lives. I certainly don’t have any secrets to impart and nothing I said in that article will come as news to anyone who’s been working diligently on their own journey to better health and more happiness, but perhaps looking at things with a different perspective might help someone else find what works for them. (I hope so, anyway.)

Your turn: what have you done this week that deserves a high five?

High Five Friday: A happy reminder about why I do what I do

highfivefriday6

I went to see my Primary Care Physician – as opposed to my Endocrinologist (diabetes doctor) – recently, because I am losing my hair. (Definitely NOT celebrating that development.) After congratulating me on my weight loss and explaining that it was probably the cause of my hair loss, the doctor ordered a comprehensive metabolic panel and lipid panel – blood and urine tests to look at how I’m doing with my diabetes and see if anything medical might be causing the hair loss.

We were both expecting to see good numbers for these tests, based on the healthy lifestyle changes I’m making, so I was anxiously awaiting the results letter. I received it on Wednesday and rushed to open the first envelope. Every number on the metabolic and lipid panels was much improved from this time last year, including my overall cholesterol, HDL (“good” cholesterol – it was way too low last year and is now safely above the “low” level), triglycerides (a whopping 93% reduction in 12 months!), and fasting blood glucose (I’m smack in the middle of the “normal” range, not even near the “impaired” much less “diabetic” ranges).

Then I opened the second letter which turned out to have the results of my Hemoglobin A1c test, measuring how well my blood sugar has been controlled for the last several months. This is significant for diabetics because fasting blood glucose only measures control for a brief moment in time but the A1c shows how you’re doing overall. The ranges for this test are:

  • Therapeutic goal of American Diabetes Association = <7.0%
  • Controlled diabetics = 6.0-8.0%
  • Non-diabetics = 4.0-6.0%

Let me interject here to say that at my last test, back in June, my result was 5.8% and my Endocrinologist and I were THRILLED with that result. So thrilled in fact that he took me off of my remaining oral diabetes medication, so this month’s test is completely without medication of any kind.

So, what was my number? My latest Hemoglobin A1c reading was 5.0%. I read it, then blinked a few times because I’m blind as a bat without my reading glasses and I thought perhaps I’d misread a 6 as a 5; I hadn’t. You guys, that means that, without chemical assistance of any kind, my body now functions like a non-diabetic person’s does. Yup, I cried. A lot. Then I sent a text message to my diabetic colleagues (also friends!) at work to tell them the wondrous news and this is the message I received in return:

“I’m so happy, Denise…this is why you do what you do.”

And then I cried even harder because yes, this is exactly why I do what I do. Why I wake up every single morning – not just the days when I’m feeling good and had enough sleep the night before, nor only on the days when I have nothing else competing for my time – and make the decision, again, to put myself and my health first. To go for a walk before work and, optimally, again in the afternoon with my team. To eat smaller amounts of low-glycemic foods and to stop before I feel full because my body can’t use the extra food properly. To make an appointment with my therapist when my depression and anxiety lead to binge eating. To faithfully keep my every three month dental cleaning appointments even though I am terrified to be there and still traumatized by having 15 teeth removed in one go last July. Complacency in any of these areas will hurt my body and I don’t intentionally do that any more. (Gosh it feels good to be able to write that last sentence.)

So that’s my “win” for this week – not too shabby, if I do say so myself!

Your turn: what have you done this week that deserves a high five?

Project Me: October & November review and my goals for the remainder of 2013

[I somehow did not do a check-in for October nor set any goals for November. Can’t fix that now, so we’ll just review how I’ve done with my goals from October before moving on to goals for December.]

My goals for October were:

  1. Stop spending so much time reading other blogs, shopping, and being a social media fan girl and actually start writing here more often – I’ve been a bit better about this and certainly I’ve written more here since setting the goal than I did before, so we’ll call this at least a partial success.
  2. Continue working on eating after 7:00 pm – Well, if you’d asked me before Thanksgiving how I was doing with this, I’d have said that it was firmly in the “win” column, but I’ve been turning to my old way of dealing with stress and anxiety (binge eating); this is not good. It’s always late at night (after 7:00 pm) and it’s always when I’m alone. You’d think the success (so far) of Project Me would have made me more relaxed and less anxious, and to a certain extent that’s true. In some ways, though, it’s actually made me more anxious and compulsive than I was before. I’m at that point now where everyone I meet is taken aback by my slimmer appearance, and most of them remark on the difference. I don’t know how to deal with compliments, particularly not about my appearance, so it produces a lot of anxiety. I’m also obsessing about losing the last six pounds I need to drop before I reach the “Overweight” BMI designation and stop being “Obese” officially. Nothing in my health is going to change in any way from losing those six pounds – it’s just a mental/emotional thing for me and I’m blowing it out of proportion. I must deal with the underlying anxiety in order to keep tight control of my diabetes but it is also a huge source of unhappiness for me and I’m tired of it.
  3. Get my flu shot and figure out what I need to do to get a pneumonia shot – did not do this. Honestly, I never really wanted to, have never done it before, and am fairly certain I’m safe without the shots.
  4. Re-jigger my schedule so that I can fit a weekly strength training session in AND go for an outdoor bike ride -Well, I achieved something close to this – I’m now taking Pilates Reformer classes twice a week, which is great for my strength training needs (and is probably contributing to my fairly drastic drop in body fat percentage). With Pilates early on Sunday morning and Weight Watchers early on Saturday, my only real option for riding my bike is Saturday after WW and that is only possible on days when I don’t have any other engagements on Saturday. I’ve managed a total of two outdoor bike rides in all of October and November and probably two or three more indoor on the stationary bike. Oh well, I’m getting lots of activity now and I’m happy with my body, so I’m not going to sweat this one.

My goals for 2013 have been published and they include:

  • fasting blood sugar reading below 130 mg/dL – already achieved, need to maintain
  • triglycerides reading less than 150 mg/dL – already achieved, need to maintain
  • body weight at or below 169 pounds (putting me into the Overweight category on BMI scale) – 35 5 more pounds in 24.5 three weeks (not sure I’ll make this one but I’m sure going to keep trying!)
  • waist measurement of not more than 39 inches –1 more inch in 24.5 three months (side note: wow, I lost 4-1/2 inches from my waist since August 1 – must have done something right!)(not sure about the likelihood of making this one, either, but I’m going to push hard)
  • an improved quality of life as perceived by me – well on my way to achieving this!

So, will I work on for the next 25 days?

  1. Make an appointment with my therapist to deal with my anxiety and the binge eating, binge shopping, and horrible obsessive/compulsive behaviors that accompany it. Period. Yup, that’s it. While the spending and the compulsive straightening up around the house are embarrassing and dangerous for my long-term happiness, the binge eating has the real potential to not just damage my body through higher blood sugars, but also knock me right off track with Project Me. This is a big milestone deliverable and it deserves my full attention for December.

So tell me: what healthy habits are you focusing on for the rest of the year?

High Five Friday: A chance to help other diabetics

highfivefriday6

This week I’m excited about an interview that I gave today to a blog with a large, national reach and a substantial focus on diabetes education.They talked to me about Project Me – how I came to start this initiative, how I chose my goals for the project – that sort of thing. I’m hoping that something in my story will help other diabetics who might be struggling to find a way to focus their desire to improve their control of this disease into something actionable and sustainable.

Your turn: what have you done this week that deserves a high five?

…and then I had a completely crazy thought

Updates since last time:

  • Went to the gym all seven days last week
  • Tracked every morsel of food that went into my mouth using MyFitnessPal
  • Made it through a mild episode of depression without turning to food. I wanted to eat, I thought a lot about eating, but instead of eating I tried to figure out what it was that I really wanted and how to get there without food. Very interesting
  • I tested my blood sugar seven times in less than a week including my pre-breakfast blood sugars every day. I haven’t tested my blood sugar since I started on insulin injections and the readings were so high that they upset me, so I put my meter away. I committed to my Making Peace With Food group – all Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics – that I would test at least once before our next class, and then when the number wasn’t too bad, I just kept going. I’m treating it like an experiment: “if it’s this number now, what will it look like right after I finish on the treadmill?” or “I wonder what my blood sugar is this morning after I had more carbs for dinner than usual?”
Peonies
Peonies by Linda N. via Flickr

So many good things are going on in my life right now and it’s wonderful but also scary. Scary because I remember what it feels like when it all goes sideways, so I’m putting in the effort now, while it’s all good, to learn how to be OK with not being 100% perfect all the time – basically learning to fail and bounce back.

Part of my strategy is to not let the scale be the sole determinant of whether or not I’m “successful”. I need to lose a LOT of weight just to be considered “overweight” (as opposed to Morbidly Obese, my current designation based on BMI) but I can’t focus on that because it’s too overwhelming, so I’m staying focused on what’s really important – my blood sugar. Good things are happening on that front, friends, and it’s very exciting! When I took my blood sugar for the first time in months last week it was 171 mg/dL which was about 40 points less than my fasting test last time I saw my endocrinologist two months ago. Target ranges for diabetics with good control are between 70 and 130 mg/dl before meals, and less than 180 two hours after starting a meal, so I knew I was a little high but was heading in the right direction. And I’ll be darned if my reading this morning before breakfast wasn’t 131 mg/dL – down 40 points in less than a week!

I also lost seven pounds this week.

And I had this crazy thought about what I can use for my long-term motivation but that will have to wait until next time. In the meantime, though, tell me how you deal with the “all or nothing”/”must be perfect in all ways” syndrome of healthy eating and exercise? Am I the only one who feels like there’s a light switch somewhere that controls my desire to eat well and exercise every day???