Manage Stress: Dealing with Diabetes Fatigue

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Successfully managing a chronic disease like type 2 diabetes requires making hundreds of decisions each day, over and over again, without end; this is exhausting. Some days this is no big deal: I eat well, I exercise, I laugh with friends and family, and I test my blood sugar when I wake up plus before and after one of my meals. Other days (sometimes for several days at a time) it’s all I can do to keep up my exercise routine – the eating, stress management, and blood sugar testing all go out the window. This phenomenon is sometimes known as “diabetes fatigue”: basically, you are burned out from all of the decisions required to successfully manage your disease every day.

So, what can you do to fight diabetes fatigue?

  • Get outside for some exercise at your own pace. You don’t have to run or power walk in order to benefit from exercise, particularly mental health benefits. Moving your body, even at the lightest intensity, will release endorphins inside your body and that will automatically lighten your mood. Besides, changing your surroundings can help change your thoughts.
  • Speaking of changing your thoughts, when you catch yourself painting your diabetes self management efforts with the “all or nothing” paintbrush, change the dialogue going on inside your head. If you’re anything like me, you are your toughest critic. Some days I have to catch myself and stop the negative self-talk. Instead of saying things like, “Managing my diabetes is too much for me, I just can’t do it,” or, “My blood sugar is high so I’m a bad diabetic,” I change my thoughts to something more positive, even if I have to fake it. “I’m doing my very best to make good decisions for my diabetes,” or, “Let me look at my food journal to see why my blood sugar is high right now – more great data that will help me make better food choices.”
  • Take extra especially good care of yourself. In addition to modifying your self-talk to be more nurturing and less perfectionistic, how about going for a facial or pedicure? If spa treatments aren’t your thing, try going to bed an extra hour early – you’ll rebuild your strength and stamina at the same time you turn off your conscious mind for a few hours, so it’s a win-win. If you have a favorite tea or other hot, calorie- and- carbohydrate-free beverage, make yourself a mug and enjoy it mindfully.
  • Chat with your general practitioner, your endocrinologist (diabetes doctor), a certified diabetes educator (CDE), or a psychotherapist. Never underestimate the power of sharing how you’re feeling with someone who can actually help you improve your situation – they’re there to help and they’ve certainly heard the same problems you’re experiencing from other clients in the past.

What you don’t want to do when the disease wears you down is give up on all of the healthy choices you are making. I know it’s challenging to keep making the tough decisions about getting some exercise versus an extra hour of sleep or having a hard boiled egg with part-skim string cheese for breakfast instead of that gorgeous blueberry scone you saw in the pastry case at your favorite coffee bar, but no one has ever regretted making those trade-offs once they are past the immediate temptation; be strong and remember that you’re worth it.

Have you ever experienced diabetes fatigue? What advice would you give someone dealing with this challenge?

p.s. If you’d like to read more about my daily life, visit my personal blog.

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